RSS

FAQ

WHO CAN ENROLL?

Any person who is above compulsory school age and officially withdrawn from public school.

WHAT ARE CLASS OFFERINGS?

GED preparation, TAAS review, basic literacy, reading, writing, math, spelling, TASP review, English-as-a-Second Language, Family Literacy, and On-Site Workforce Training/Development classes are offered.

WHERE ARE CLASSES LOCATED?

Classes are located at various sites in McLennan, Bosque, Falls, and Hill counties.  These classes meet at various times, so that a student can find a convenient time and location to study.

WHEN CAN A PERSON ENROLL?

A student may enroll any time a class is in session.

WHAT IS THE COST OF CLASSES?

Most classes are offered free of charge.  Books and materials are offered free to students who are enrolled in the classes.  There is a small fee for the On-Site Workforce Training/Development Classes.

WHAT ARE CLASS SIZES?

Individualized, small groups, and one-on-one tutoring is available.

HOW ARE CLASSES STAFFED?

Classes are staffed with instructors who hold at least a Bachelors degree.  Volunteer tutors are utilized in the program.

HOW LONG MUST SOMEONE ATTEND CLASSES?

This depends on the students’ goals as well as the level of the student.

WHAT HAPPENS IF A STUDENT IS ABSENT FROM CLASS?

A student may attend as much or as little as he desires.  Classes are self-paced and individualized.

HOW CAN I OBTAIN ADDITIONAL INFORMATION?

We can be contacted at 299-8777 or 299-8052 or you can drop by the Adult Education office located at The MCC Community Services Center at 4601 N. 19th Street.

How will this cost be spread across subjects (Mathematics, Social Studies, Literacy & Science)?

GED Testing Service is still determining how the costs will be spread across subtests, since the two former

Language Arts tests are being combined in the new assessment. We are studying the optimal structure that

works best for testing centers and is easiest for test-takers to understand. We anticipate a decision and

announcement on this topic within the next couple of months.

Will test center compensation change?

No. The test center compensation will remain the same as it is for the GED® test on computer:$5 per hour (per

person) or approximately $38 for the entire test.

How is test center compensation affected by extra time required for approved test accommodations?

The costs for test-takers that require double time as an approved accommodation will continue at US$120, but

testing centers will continue to receive $5 per hour (or approximately $76 for the entire test in this example).

Will test-takers have a harder time passing the new GED® test?

There is no doubt that the content on which the new GED® assessment is based is different from the content on which current and prior versions of the GED® test were based. This new—and some may say more rigorous— content is essential because the skills required for jobs that pay family-sustaining wages have also increased. The new test must reflect the realities of both the workplace and of postsecondary education (given that so many jobs require some postsecondary education or training). It is important that the high school equivalency standard for the new GED® assessment reflect the actual performance of graduating high school seniors—a group of students who have not received instruction in career- and college-readiness content, but who, nonetheless, will be receiving high school diplomas. Byconducting a standardization study in fall 2013 with a diverse national sample of high school seniors representative of the range of students expected to graduate from high school in spring 2014, the GED Testing Service will ensure that the high school equivalency cut point on our new test has parity with the performance expectations for current high school graduates—just as is the case on the 2002 Series test.

Will test-takers pay more for the new GED® test?

Each state will set test-taker fees based on whether or not – or to what extent – to subsidize the US$120 cost.

The current paper-based GED® test-taker fees across the country range from $0 to more than $300, depending

on the cost to deliver the paper-based test, level of state funds contributed, and the availability of funds being

contributed by organizations who run GED® test centers.

Will there be support for test takers that cannot afford their states test-taker fees?

In a study released in 2010, we found that 46,000 test-takers had received $3.3 million in scholarships and

grants to take the GED® test. We don’t assume that amount was sufficient to cover the needs of all of the most

vulnerable test-takers. We believe that there are additional supports for test-takers that can be implemented—

like voucher programs and state, local and national organizations working together to consolidate funds in the

adult education system. We also think that given the new GED® test’s direction that employers and foundations will be encouraged to participate more actively in programs that result in a higher skilled, better prepared workforce. In fact, one state that has recently begun offering the GED® test on computer is expected to announce a significant scholarship effort funded by an employer in the coming months. GED Testing Service

will also be seeking opportunities to assist test-takers with the greatest need.

Advertisements
 

Comments are closed.

 
%d bloggers like this: